Copenhagen 

I read a lot of blog posts before arriving here but was still surprised by the vibrancy of this city. The people are fit and friendly. The metro runs fast and smooth deep beneath the city. The terminals and escalators are sleek and clean. 

We found a small, quiet restaurant in the Norrebro neighborhood. The restaurant, called Gonzo, was lit with candles and hosted by a young woman who made us feel right at home. We met an expat from Iran who seconded a tip we received on the Metro about going to Louisiana. Not the state in the US but the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art which is 45 minutes north of Copenhagen on the coast. We are visiting it today, with our friend Lisbeth who lives in Christianshavn. 

On day two we did the stroll through Nyhavn which felt like an upscale Fishermans Wharf in our San Francisco. The buildings are colorful, the tour boats are spacious and the beer was flowing. We kept walking. 


We wandered through Christiania, a neighborhood with lots of graffiti, people enjoying a good meal at outdoor food stands and Cannabis for sale in a street fair environment. No photography allowed but I grabbed a graffiti shot as we left. 

And on the way home from our 31st anniversary dinner we used restrooms at the metro stop. 

Restroom in metro looks like art museum.

Mountain Moment

The green glows like electricity.  It’s everywhere in the forest. It’s on the ground, stuck on twigs like christmas decoration. I get lost by moving it. The electriciy goes dim, the sky turns blue, my wrist begins to throb.


A beast lives deep in the valley, out of sight, lonely, blue, true to its nature.  Heaven and earth cannot move it into the light until it decides for itself. Footsteps crunch bark, boasting its strength as the day heat dims. While the town goes to close, the beast’s wide eyes glow bright red, so fierce they could start a fire.

The wind pulls tufts of moss from the tall pine, with the broken branch that healed itself, then started growing down until it fused with a granite slab and made a seat large enogh for a family of four.

Over the mountains the clouds drift east until I stop to ponder their movement. Then they stand still, quiet like fog.

 

 

 

Iris Awakening

A friend gave me a beautiful yellow Iris a few years back. Each May, it bloomed and brought me a smile. His did the same, on or about his birthday. But our Echium (Pride of Madeira) grew to overwhelm the Iris. The Iris leafed but wouldn’t bloom from under the spreading Echium. The image below was its 2015 bloom. 


This year the Echium got leggy, branches broke, flowers dimmed. On a lark we had our gardener pull the sucker. 

Now hundreds of baby Echium fight each other for space as our patient Iris is strutting its stuff. 

Tiny Bubbles

Few, if any, have gone before

a long line of, are they

heroes? At the helm

the red-haired

one.

Did he

fool them?

In my bubble

the mindset of those

who would have my soul,

wash away my sins to the rivers

of unknown things, the height

of my stupidity.  Leave me

this day or pray to a god

gone missing, who sees

the world a scary place

they worship hateful

Hemmingway who is

to say which way

right. What is a

liberal

doing in the middle?

Listen, quiet your mind,

let the streams fill to over

flowing, birds flit in and out of

reach, tiny sparrows singing true

to you, your long long days of waiting

and watching for the sign that it’s time to

uphold the truths that are not yet self evident.

Chilly Birds With My Lovely

We hadn’t been to Sacramento’s Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area, for birding, the past couple of years.  It’s a dream come true in the right conditions, and yesterday was one of those days.  At 4 pm the temperature was around 44 degrees, damp, with just enough of a breeze to send the wind through my jeans. Glad we brought the Rav4, since the road was rutted with plenty of potholes and slippery with mud.

There were Snow Geese, Black Neck Stilt, Northern Shoveler, Pintale, Cinnamon Teal, Common Egret, Great Blue Heron, a murmuration of Starling, Coot, Canada Geese, Red Shouldered Hawk (though we had misidentified it before running into some locals with expensive glass who let us peep through their spotting scopes.) There was a Plover I could not identify and at least one Swallow that disappeared before we got a decent look.

We saw a flock of Snow Geese take off maybe 1/2 mile away and right beneath them a storm of rusty shaded ducks took off and filled the sky. Our spotting scope friends said they saw an Eagle swoop in and that’s what spooked the mass.  There’s something about that many birds in one place that fills me with joy.

On our way out we stopped for this sweet little reflection pond.  Back toward the Snow Geese, the sky was strewn with ribbons of migrating birds, going in so many directions.  At one point there was a murmuration of geese, that broke into dozens of Vee formations, some of which flew right over us.

If you’re ever in the area, give yourself time to wander around, and bring mud boots. And remind me to bring more than one set of binoculars, and my Lumix camera with the 600mm lens.