Bye Bye Boston

Blog post

We started and ended our New England adventure at Logan where water surrounds the greater Boston area. It was odd to have the ocean so near yet not be aware of its presence, it’s scent. But the leaves left me longing for more.
The stately yellow tree on Letti and Dan’s quiet little Cambridge street was my favorite. It must have peaked the week we arrived. In the early morning light it simply glowed.


One windy afternoon we returned to find the street littered bright yellow. The stairs to our neighbor’s porch wore a fresh dressing from the fallen leaves.


Returning from a week in Maine where I found flannel-lined jeans and an extra thick beanie my best friends we found our tree quite barren. The wind and chill had shaken the color right out of the hood.

 The final image hints at winter with blues and cool pastels.

  We’re headed for warmth and paddle boarding in the Florida Mangroves.

The Green Monster

I started this post from the Fenway Park writer’s press box where sports writers craft articles about the Red Sox and their opponents. We’d just stood atop the green monster and heard how Ruth was sold to the Yankees back in 1912 for a stunning $100,000, then went on to set record after record while the Red Sox struggled.  To this day some feel there’s a curse on the sox from that ill-fated sale.

Fenway fans are close to the action in this small, intimate ball park.  I could be a Boston fan.  I could live in Boston.  There’s water all around the city, and waves in the winter just up or down the coast.

Among other Hollywood movies Moneyball, Ted, and Field of Dreams were partially filmed at Fenway.


There’s still a single red seat in right field that marks the longest home run ever hit in the park.  It was a 502 foot blast by Ted Williams on June 9, 1946.